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The Administrative Justice Council’s first Annual Report

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Interesting report on the first year’s work of the Administrative Justice Council
It is taking forward many of the issues identified by its predecessor bodies, but the work on the interfaces between tribunals and ombudsmen is new.

UKAJI

The Administrative Justice Council’s first Annual Report

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On 6th November, the Administrative Justice Council published its first annual report for 2018-19.

The Administrative Justice Council (AJC) was set up in March 2018 and is the successor body to the Administrative Justice Forum. It provides oversight and advice on administrative justice across the UK.  Chaired by the Rt Hon Sir Ernest Ryder, Senior President of Tribunals, the Council seeks to make the administrative justice system more efficient, fair and accessible.

The scale of administrative justice is vast, often called the ‘cinderella’ of the justice system.   It covers all government decisions, including complaints and appeals on immigration and asylum, social security, housing, education, health care, planning, and tax.

Over the year, the AJC has identified four key areas of focus: improving first instance government decision-making; the impact of the courts and tribunals modernisation programme; ombudsman reform and improving the relationship between…

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Written by lwtmp

November 8, 2019 at 11:53 am

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Reforming referendums: how can their use and conduct be improved?

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This report, published in July 2018, provides a valuable analysis of the use of referendums, suggesting ways in which their use could be better structured

The Constitution Unit Blog

jess.sargeant.resizedalan_renwick_webThis week’s turbulent political events represent the fallout from a referendum where the consequences of a ‘change vote’ were unclear. This is just one of many concerns raised about recent UK referendums. To reflect on such problems and consider possible solutions, the Constitution Unit established the Independent Commission on Referendums. Here Jess Sargeant and Alan Renwick summarise the Commission’s conclusions and recommendations.

The Independent Commission on Referendums has published its final report today. This sets out almost 70 conclusions and recommendations, all agreed unanimously by the 12 distinguished Commissioners, who span the major divides in recent referendums. The report is the product of eight months of discussion and deliberation amongst the Commissioners, backed by comprehensive Constitution Unit research into referendums in the UK and other democracies. The Commission has also consulted widely with experts and the public, including seminars in each of the four constituent countries of the…

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Written by lwtmp

November 30, 2018 at 11:08 am

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Post-implementation review of LASPO Part 2: the Jackson Reforms

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I have noted elsewhere the fact that the Government has started a post-implementation review of the Legal Aid Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 (LASPO). (See this blog, March 2018 and September 2018).

The principal focus is on changes to the legal aid scheme – Part 1 of the Act.

Part 2 of the Act introduced changes to the costs rules relating to civil litigation proposed in the review led by Lord Justice Jackson.

Progress with this review has been slower than with the legal aid review. But in June 2018, the Government published a short statement on how it thought the changes were going, and set out a number of questions on which it sought evidence from practitioners and other civil justice stakeholders.

The focus of the inquiry is on the five principal reforms contained in the Act. They are

  • (i) non-recoverability of Conditional Fee Agreement success fees;
  • (ii) non-recoverability of After the Event insurance premiums,
  • (iii) the introduction of Damages-Based Agreements,
  • (iv) section 55 changes to Part 36 offers to settle proceedings,
  • (v) banning referral fees in personal injury cases.

The preliminary view of officials is that while their introduction was very contoversial, they are working pretty well in practice.

In June 2018, the Government has published an initial assessment together with a list of questions to which it hopes practitioners will respond during the summer of 2018. A further report will be published in due course.

The document is available at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/719140/pir-part-2-laspo-initial-assessment.pdf

 

 

 

 

Written by lwtmp

September 15, 2018 at 3:29 pm

Understanding the SQE and what it means for me | The University of Law

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Excellent summary of pending changes to the route to qualification for solicitors. Further postings will appear as details become clearer and timelines are settled

Source: Understanding the SQE and what it means for me | The University of Law

Written by lwtmp

February 26, 2018 at 11:26 am

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A right to justice? The Bach Commission Final Report

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Interesting summary of the Bach Report on a Right to Justice

Source: A right to justice? The Bach Commission Final Report

Written by lwtmp

November 1, 2017 at 10:37 am

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UKAJI New Voices Workshop: Report

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Interesting collections of papers by younger researchers in administrative justice

 

Source: UKAJI New Voices Workshop: Report

Written by lwtmp

October 30, 2017 at 5:33 pm

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Where do we need to go with research in administrative justice?

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Written by lwtmp

September 18, 2017 at 9:57 am

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